Halloween Dog Parade

Join us on Saturday, October 20th at Hintonburg Park for Ottawa’s first Halloween Dog Parade! Dogs and dog lovers from all over the National Capital Region will be celebrating Halloween by dressing up their doggos (and perhaps themselves) for an afternoon of fun, food and fido. There will be prizes for best costumed dogs, celebrity judges, food and drinks, vendors, and, of course, the Parade of Dogs. All funds raised will support Dovercourt’s Work and Volunteer Experience (WAVE) program for adults with autism and other special needs. The WAVE program raises awareness and opportunities for adults with special needs through work placements and participation in the community. To participate, register online or at the event for $10. Entrance to the event is free and donations to WAVE are welcome. If you are unable to attend but would still like to make a donation we have set up a fund! Feel free to e-transfer any amount ($25 and more receives a tax receipt) to:...
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Touching and Autism

Living with Autism is living on spectrum. It is a condition that affects people in different ways. This April for Autism Awareness Month some WAVE volunteers and apprentices will be sharing their perspectives on common beliefs, myths, and misunderstanding related to Autism Spectrum Disorder. It is a commonly held belief that people with autism don’t like to be touched. In fact physical contact with someone with autism can incite a wide variety of reactions depending on the individual. Some people on the spectrum are hypersensitive to touch, especially if it’s unexpected or too invasive. A hypersensitive person might even reject certain types of clothing due to how it feels on their skin. Too much stimulation can lead to someone with hypersensitivity experiencing sensory overload. It should be noted that they often don’t have control over their condition, and will need to calm down in a safe and controllable environment. On the other hand, there are individuals who are hyposensitive to touch, which...
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Humour and Autism

Living with Autism is living on spectrum. It is a condition that affects people in different ways. This April for Autism Awareness Month some WAVE volunteers and apprentices will be sharing their perspectives on common beliefs, myths, and misunderstanding related to Autism Spectrum Disorder. It’s a common misconception that people on the autism spectrum lack a sense of humour. In reality though, people with autism can have a sense of humour that is just as well developed as neurotypicals. It’s just often different. Comedian Dan Aykroyd, writer and star of the little known 1984 film Ghostbusters, was diagnosed with Aspergers syndrome as an adult. In 2013 Aykroyd said he was inspired to write Ghostbusters by his twin “obsessions” with ghosts and law enforcement. For most people these two subjects would seem pretty disconnected and not particularly funny in and of themselves. But Aykroyd’s unique perspective allowed him to combine the two. Michael McCreary is an autistic stand-up comedian in his early 20s. His...
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